Please begin Yarnell Hill Fire Chapter XXIII here

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Chapter I, Chapter II, Chapter II supplement, Chapter III, Chapter IV, Chapter V, Chapter VI, Chapter VII, Chapter VIII , Chapter IX,  Chapter X, Chapter XI, Chapter XII , Chapter XIII, Chapter XIV,  Chapter XV,  Chapter XVI, Chapter XVII, Chapter XVIII, Chapter XIX, Chapter XX, Chapter XXI and Chapter XXII.

Vancouver Island University added to Flin Flon Flim Flam tour

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InvestigativeMEDIA has added Vancouver Island University to its list of July screenings as it concludes its cross-Canada tour presenting the documentary film “Flin Flon Flim Flam.”

The film will be shown in five locations in British Columbia between July 9 and July 15.

“I’m delighted that professors at Okanagan College and Vancouver Island University are sponsoring screenings of the film that documents Toronto-based Hudbay Minerals’ worldwide operations,” said filmmaker John Dougherty.

“This documentary brings an important message to Canadians about the operations of a multinational mining company that is rarely discussed in the mainstream media that is suppressed by Canada’s right-to-reputation law,” he said.

The film documents how Hudbay Minerals contaminated its home town of Flin Flon with heavy metals; stands accused of human rights atrocities in Guatemala that has attracted coverage in the New York Times and the Toronto Star; used the Peruvian National Police to beat demonstrators at its Constancia mine site and is seeking to destroy one of the world’s most sensitive desert-aquatic environments in southern Arizona.

Amnesty International’s Human Right Radio interviewed Mr. Dougherty in June on CJTR 91.3 FM in Regina. The interview is available as a podcast from Amnesty International’s Human Rights Radio.

Mr. Dougherty will answer questions from the audience following each screening. Admission is free.

The tour continues in July with screenings at 7 p.m., July 9 at the Okanagan College Lecture Theatre, Kelowna; 3 p.m., July 10 at the Salmar Classic in Salmon Arm; 7 p.m., July 12 at the Cinematheque in Vancouver; 7 p.m., July 14, Vancouver Island University, Building 200, Theatre Room 203, Nanaimo, B.C. and 7 p.m., July 15 at The Vic in Victoria.

Questions remain three years after Yarnell Hill Fire disaster

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Hearses carrying the bodies of Granite Mountain Hotshots passes through Peeples Valley. Photo By John Dougherty

Hearses carrying the bodies of Granite Mountain Hotshots pass through Peeples Valley, AZ. Photo By John DoughertyNews Analysis

News Analysis

Jasper, Alberta—Three years ago today, at 4:42 p.m., 19 members of the Granite Mountain Hotshots were killed when a fast-moving wildfire entrapped them in a box canyon at the base of the Weaver Mountains west of Yarnell, AZ.

Since that day of wildland firefighting infamy, three books have been published that have yet to answer why the men were in a location they should never have been. And now, a major Hollywood movie is in production that will ultimately completely distort what happened on that tragic afternoon. (How could you, Jeff Bridges?)

More than 22,000 comments have been posted on this site, some of which have helped piece together much of what happened on the worst day of firefighting in the history of Interagency Hotshot Crews after two state-sponsored investigations failed to provide a clear explanation.

But the ultimate “Why”, remains sealed, locked in the code of silence that permeates the world of wildland firefighting where the fear of telling the truth falls a distant third to securing a high-dollar government pension and avoid being blacklisted.

[Read more…]

SW wildfire agencies issue updated structure protection rules

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The Southwest Coordinating Group this week released an updated guideline for fighting wildfires in the “Wildland Urban Interface” and for structural protection.

“SWCG’s first and foremost intent is to protect human life (i.e. keep our firefighters and the public safe),” states the June 17 memo sent to Southwest Agency Administrators, incident commanders and zone chairs.

“Secondly, once firefighter and public safety has been established, firefighting responders and resources will work aggressively to keep any wildfire away from structures and communities.

“All strategies and tactics will be based on this intent; fully understanding we will not be able to protect structures in every situation.

“Management of risk to responders, fire behavior, resource availability, and other critical factors will all dictate and/or contribute to the appropriate strategy/strategies implemented.”

The memo was sent to the Arizona State Forestry Division, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, New Mexico State Forestry Division, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Forest Service.

The memo concludes stating: “Wildland fire resources across the Southwest generally do not have the responsibility per policy as well as the the capability and training to perform structure fire suppression actions.”